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Three Great Things About Living in Shiga

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One great thing about living in the countryside is that you don’t have to travel far to enjoy your outdoor activities. During the summer holiday, I didn’t get out of Shiga, the prefecture I live in, to go mountain climbing, cycling, and to go to the beach.

伊吹景色

We climbed Mt. Ibuki on the first day, and it was only 1 and half hour drive to get there. Actually, there is a mountain near my house and I can even walk there from my front door.

小野西明寺

There are a plenty of places like that near my house to ride my mountain bike. I did some cycling with my son during the holiday.

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Finally, we went swimming at Lake Biwa, which is the biggest lake in Japan and you feel like swimming in the sea.  Yes, here in Shiga, you don’t need to go to the sea to find a beach. There are a lot of white sand beaches at the lake, and they are better for children to swim.

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After swimming, you can find a cafe like that.

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cafe in katada

We can go to Kyoto or Osaka easily, too, if we miss a city life. Shiga is a great place to lead a country life.

Shiga is a fabulous place to visit for foreign tourists, as well. If you are visiting Japan, don’t go to Tokyo or Kyoto, but come to Shiga. I’ll tell you why in the next post.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What Would Happen If You Set Your Goal to Earn $ 10,000 a Month?

Click here to get a free newsletter Zen and a Way of sustainable prosperity: Balance, financial success, and sustainability with the secrets of the Japanese Omi-merchants.

 

In ZENWSP, we spend a lot of time checking whether your goal is relevant to the 7 elements of sustainable prosperity which include Sanpo-Yoshi. Therefore you will end up setting a very different kind of goal from a goal you would set based on conventional motivational success philosophies.

 

 

I have changed my goal income completely after checking the relevancy. When I started English coaching, I remembered a method I was advised to use by a seminar back in the days, which was to set a goal of earning $10,000 a month. The idea of earning $10,000 a month was attractive to me because it would definitely upgrade my financial situation and it would be the proof that I will have transformed my way of thinking and doing. I decided to give a shot. Before I did, I opted to check the goal and see if it was congruent with my ecosystem.

 

The first thing I did was look at how I could achieve the goal. According to my research, there were two ways I could use to earn $10,000 per month as an English coach.

 

  1. First, I could increase the number of my coaching sessions. Since I intended to charge $50 per session, that meant to achieve the goal, I was supposed to give 200 sessions per month and 50 sessions per week. For this method to work, I needed to find many clients, which required me to do some major advertising and socializing so I could hand out my business cards to various people. It meant I would be working 12 hours a day seven days a week. That meant I wouldn’t get time to spend with my family, friends, and even be in nature.

 

  1. The second way was for me to hike up my coaching fee to something such as $500 per session. This was a lot of money, but many coaches charged that kind of money. By charging this much, I wouldn’t need to find a lot of clients, and my sessions would have been fewer. My monthly sessions would be 20, and my weekly sessions would be 5. For me, one session per day and not needing to look for a large number of clients was magical. However, with that said, it was extremely difficult to get clients who were willing to pay such a high fee. It wasn’t congruent with my value either. It could even have damaged my reputation.

 

After looking at the two ways, I concluded that they were both not coinciding with my ecosystem and that changed my goal of earning $10,000 to earning $3,000 a month, which was more relevant to my ecosystem and values.

 

There could be more ways to achieve the first goal, but you still need to think about what it takes to obtain it and whether it is worth it.

 

In Japan, we have a summer holiday starting tomorrow, so I won’t be able to post a blog for a week. I will be back on the 17th.

 

Also, my talk on August 19th will be postponed to October 14th. I am sorry for the inconvenience.

 

Well, I hope you have good summer, and I’ll see you in a week.

 

How to Set Your SMART Goal Smartly

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If your definition of success is different from the general one, you will set your goal differently, too, and how you set your goal will determine how you move toward your goal.

 

Today, let me talk about goal setting.

 

Goal setting is one of the elements constantly appearing in motivational success philosophies. It is a widely recognized strategy to succeed. They all said that by setting a clear goal, it makes you easy to visualize your business outcome. They shared examples of people with written goals having a higher success rate than people without them. It is a common practice in the business world.

 

One of the most popular ways of setting your goal is a SMART goal. A SMART goal stands for, specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and time bound. In simple terms, it means the goal you set for your business should be specific, measurable, attainable, and relevant to your ecosystem and values. It also needs to have a set deadline.

 

For example, your goal is to be successfully running an organic food restaurant in 3 years. Let’s check to see if it is SMART.

 

Is it specific? No, it isn’t specific enough.

 

Is it measurable? No, it isn’t. What do you mean by successfully? You want to project your yearly income so you can know if you will have achieved your goal at the end of the year.

 

Is it time bound? Yes, it is.

 

Is it attainable? You need to be more specific to assess whether it is attainable or not.

 

So, let’s make it more specific. My goal is to run an organic Italian restaurant with biodynamically produced ingredients. My targeted customers are health-conscious people who want to enjoy dining out in the evening. I will be earning $40,000 annually in 3 years.

 

Now, is it attainable? It depends on your capability, but 3 years may be a bit too short to achieve it since it takes time to establish your brand. How about in 5 years? Now it is more achievable.

 

Lastly, is it relevant to your ecosystem and values? In this context, ecosystem should mean your life as a whole. How it will relate to other areas of your life like your relationship with your friends and family, your health, your spirituality, and so on. These are the areas I covered in Zen and a Way of Sustainable Prosperity as the 7 elements of sustainable prosperity.

 

If you are targeting customers who enjoy dining out in the evening, your restaurant will be open at night. In this case, you can ask a question like, how will it affect your relationship with your family?

 

It is better if you can set a goal that is congruent with other areas of your life. If you can’t, you need to find ways to compensate mismatching elements. For example, you can make sure to spend time with your children on your days off. I have the same problem. My coaching sessions tend to concentrate in the evening, so what I do is I always make myself available for my son on the weekends.

 

In ZENWSP, we spend a lot of time checking whether your goal is relevant to the 7 elements of sustainable prosperity which include Sanpo-Yoshi. Therefore you will end up setting a very different kind of goal from a goal you would set based on conventional motivational success philosophies.

 

I have changed my goal income completely after checking the relevancy. I will talk about it tomorrow.

 

Why Aren’t the Tips in Motivational Success Philosophies Shared Among People Who Lead Sustainable Ways of Living?

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One of the reasons why I would like to share motivational success philosophies to people who lead sustainable lifestyles is that I don’t feel methods to succeed are introduced to sustainable people so much.

 

I think there are two reasons for it.

 

One is that the ways many of the motivational success philosophies are presented don’t appeal to sustainable people, since they stress materialistic success.

 

The other reason is that many of the people promoting motivational success philosophies aren’t targeting sustainable people, because it isn’t a lucrative market. It is better to target business people or people who have the money and desire to go upward-mobile, if they want to be successful by teaching motivational success philosophies.

 

No wonder why they entice people with a Porsche, a penthouse suit, or a 10000 dollar monthly income for their seminars.

 

I criticized that in my book Zen and a Way of Sustainable Prosperity, but they were not contradicting themselves if they were targeting the people who would respond to those catch phrases. They were following their method.

 

It is a vicious circle that people who are interested in materialistic gains will continue to learn the skills to achieve their goals, but people who are interested in sustainability won’t.

 

The tips taught in motivational success philosophies such as goal setting, how to plan, how to utilize natural resources, and the law of attraction are very useful: They can not only help your environmentally friendly business, but also they can help your political activities, or other social activities. It is a pity if they are only available to people who are money oriented.

 

What will happen if we set our goals properly, start planning and taking massive action, utilize natural resources and the law of attraction with the definition of success set by ZENWSP?

 

Our state of the world will be different.

 

 

This is an Image of a Successful Lifestyle in the New Era

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To sums up my point, this is an image of a successful lifestyle in the new era.

 

Living in the countryside.

Living in an eco-house or reusing an old house.

Having a small garden and growing your own vegetables.

Riding a bicycle.

Being self-employed, conducting a Sanpo-Yoshi-business and earning enough money to live comfortably but not too much.

By reusing or recycling, reducing living expenses to be able to live comfortably without earning so much.

Eating organic and natural food, including fermented food.

Meditating in the morning or doing some kind of morning ritual.

Spending a lot of time with your family and having a good relationship with your family.

Having a network of friends who have common visions locally.

Participating in political or social activities to shift the society to be sustainable and holistic.

In doing so, being influential by having enough resources such as money or a network of people.

 

This is just an image, and each element can be different depending on your circumstances, but anyhow, it is quite different from the common image of a successful lifestyle, isn’t it?  If many people start aiming to live like this, don’t you think the world will be a much better place?

 

Using What You Have is One of the Secrets for Sustainable Prosperity

Click here to get a free newsletter Zen and a Way of sustainable prosperity: Balance, financial success, and sustainability with the secrets of the Japanese Omi-merchants.

 

I said that MOTTAINAI was often used in the context of reuse. Reusing old things is becoming popular in Japan now. Living in a Kominka, a traditional style house is one, wearing a Kimono, a traditional costume is another.

着物祭1

Since we live in a Kominka, we have a lot of Kimonos; my wife has been wearing them regularly. This year I started wearing Kimonos, too.

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I feel very wealthy wearing them; they have so much richness from the history. I feel part of the culture inheriting strength and wisdom from the people in the past.

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It is high quality, too and MOTTAINAI not to wear it.

 

You don’t need to buy expensive clothes; you can just use what you have to feel prosperous.

 

MOTTAINAI is a Permacultural Way of Thinking

Click here to get a free newsletter Zen and a Way of sustainable prosperity: Balance, financial success, and sustainability with the secrets of the Japanese Omi-merchants.

 

After writing yesterday’s post, one Japanese word appeared in my mind, to sum up my point. That is MOTTAINAI.

 

MOTTAINAI means it is a waste, or what a waste. In Japan, this expression is used a lot in an ecological context, especially to promote reuse.

 

Setting a field where you frequently visit far from the house is MOTTAINAI, because it is a waste of time and energy.

 

Producing more cars, TVs, computers when there are already enough is MOTTAINAI.

 

And so-called successful people using their talent and energy into building more than enough wealth is MOTTAINAI, when they can contribute a lot to the world by pouring their energy toward different directions.

 

It sums up, doesn’t it?

 

Today, I would like to add one MOTTAINAI. It is MOTTAINAI for sustainable people not taking effective actions to paint the world in their color.

 

This week, I have been writing a lot on my Japanese blog, too.

https://ameblo.jp/column-takamiya/